VIEW THE MOBILE VERSION of www.seastories.ca Informational Site Network Informational
Privacy
  Home - Stories - Sea Monsters

Sea Stories

Seamen Wintering In Spitzbergen
On the 30th of August 1633, the Dutch fleet sailed fr...

Adventures Of Philip Ashton Who After Escaping From Pirates Lived Sixteen Months In Solitude On A Desolate Island
On Friday the 15th of June 1722, after being out some...

Boats Model-boat Making Etcetera

Leaving the subject of ancient ships and navigation,...

Fingal's Cave
The most magnificent of all known caverns, is that ca...

Narrative Of The Mutiny Of The _bounty_
About the year 1786, the merchants and planters i...

In The Harbor Of Fayal
On the lake front at Chicago during the World's Fair,...

An Account Of Four Russian Sailors Abandoned On The Island Of East Spitzbergen
In the year 1743, a merchant of Mesen, in Russia, fit...

Read More





Mr Midshipman Easy






Jack Easy, the hero of Captain Marryat's story, was "no fool, but a
bit of a philosopher." He had been spoiled by an indulgent mother and
a foolish father, who was continually prosing about "equality and the
rights of man." Indeed, Jack could even out-talk his father upon this
subject. "There was no end to Jack's arguing the point, though there
seldom was point to his argument." At sixteen he resolved to leave
school and go to sea; and though Mr. Easy was unwilling, Jack insisted
on his "rights" as his father's "equal," and the old man yielded. He
was to sail as midshipman on the sloop-of-war Harpy, with Captain
Wilson, a relative of his father's. He set out for Portsmouth with
plenty of money in his pockets, and squandering this he loitered three
weeks in the town without reporting to his ship. When Captain Wilson
heard of this he sent Mr. Sawbridge, his lieutenant, to summon the
boy. Mr. Sawbridge peremptorily ordered Jack on board; but the officer
was not in uniform, and Jack did not understand naval etiquette. He
pertly refused to go until he should be ready, arguing his "equality"
with any officer. Lieutenant Sawbridge departed, threatening that if
Jack did not appear that night a file of marines should arrest him in
the morning. He reported Jack's disobedience to the Captain, but the
latter, hoping to undo the father's foolish lessons, resolved to
discipline the boy gradually and gently. He sent a note inviting him
to breakfast at nine on the following morning, which invitation Jack
politely accepted. The next few pages give Jack's first experience of
"equality" at sea.





Next: Equality At Sea

Previous: Sailors Yarns



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 837